Speed Up Network

So how to speed up network? Nothing is as annoying as slow network connection. Even if you have good hardware, you will not enjoy the real speed of your computer if your Internet connection is slow. Sometimes the only way to make things faster is to upgrade your broadband plan. However, there are some tips how to speed up network that really make a difference without costing anything. Here they are.

Remove My Network Places shortcuts

If you are wondering how to speed up network and make sharing files faster, you should remove all shortcuts from My Network Places. These shortcuts are created automatically and most of the time they are not needed. Not to mention that they often become invalid. And when they become invalid, Windows still searches for them even when they are never shared anymore. This slows things down. To remove these shortcuts, highlight them and press Delete on your keyboard.

Reset your network

If you are thinking how to speed up network when your Internet becomes very slow all of a sudden, you should reset your network by restarting your router. That’s easy enough – simply disconnect from the Internet and power down your PC. Then restart your router by switching it off and on again. Wait for the router to fully boot and start your computer. The speed should be back to normal.

Check your router and home phone for possible conflicts

Another suggestion how to speed up network. Sometimes your Internet connection can become slow because of home phone and router conflicts. This happens when your router and your cordless phone use the same frequency. If that’s the case, it can cause your Internet connection to slow down every time your phone is used. So, check your phone’s technical specs and see if there are any conflicts. If the phone uses the 900Mhz frequency, then it shouldn’t be affecting your router. But if your phone is using 2.4Ghz or 5.8Ghz, then it may be the cause of slow Internet connection. To fix the problem, try moving the phone to a different room or buy a different phone for your house.

Upgrade the firmware for your router

Another answer to the how to speed up network question is upgrading the firmware for your router. Quite often your network can become slow if your router’s firmware is out of date. That’s why you should check your router manufacturer’s site every now and again for firmware updates and apply them as soon as they are issued. Just make sure that you are applying the correct update for your model.

How to speed up network even more? Perform PC maintenance!

Even if you are on a fast broadband plan, browsing the Web won’t be fast if your computer is slow. So another way how to speed up network has little to do with the network itself – you simply need to perform some PC maintenance. Believe it or not, deleting temporary files, defragmenting your hard disk and running PC speedup software can speed up your Internet connection a great deal.
These simple how to speed up network tips will make using your network and browsing the Web faster and a lot more enjoyable.

How to Check Your Computer’s Performance

Before looking into your computer’s performance, check out which Internet speeds are compatible with your hardware and software by visiting XFINITY Internet Minimum System Recommendations.

Now, you can learn how to analyze your computer’s speed and find out if it’s performing at the level it should be by following the tips below.
Overview

Are you concerned about your computer’s speed and want to check to make sure it’s running as fast as possible? While your Internet speed determines how fast your computer or network can load websites or download files, your computer’s processor speed and amount of memory (or RAM) affects the speed with which you can open and run programs.
Processor speed indicates how fast your computer runs, and is measured in megahertz (MHz) and gigahertz (GHz). Comcast recommends a minimum of 800 MHz for Mac computers and 1.5 GHz for PCs using Windows.
Memory or RAM is storage space your computer uses to store and read data. The more memory your computer has, the faster it can open and run programs. Comcast recommends at least 1GB of memory for all computers, and more is better. RAM can be added to your computer physically with a piece of hardware known as a RAM module.

Even with a fast Internet connection, low processor speeds or memory can slow down your computer’s entire system. If you’re concerned about your computer’s performance, you can check your computer including processor speed and available memory by reviewing the operating system information for Windows and Mac that follows.
Windows

Click Start.
Select the Control Panel.
Navigating to the Control Panel from the Start Menu in Windows

Select System. Some users will have to select System and Security, and then select System from the next window.
The Control Panel in Windows

Select the General tab. Here you can find your processor type and speed, its amount of memory (or RAM), and your operating system.
The General tab in the Control Panel displaying system information – Windows
Mac

Click on the Apple icon.
Select About This Mac from the drop-down menu.
The Apple drop-down menu – Mac OS X

Click the More Info button. Here you can find your processor type and speed, its amount of memory (or RAM), and your operating system.

Speed Up Internet Connection

This day and age we are used to life at its top speed thanks to various means of instant communication. That’s why there are very few things that are more frustrating than slow Internet that can basically turn your life into a nightmare. Sometimes speeding up Internet is a simple question of upgrading your plan or changing your service provider.

However, sometimes even users who are paying for high speed Internet access can experience surprisingly slow Internet connection. Fortunately, there are ways to speed up Internet without having to change your ISP or buying a more powerful computer. Here are some tips on how to speed up your computer Internet connection without too much hassle.
1. Talk to your provider

First of all, call your service provider and check whether they are doing their job properly and delivering the service you are paying for. Or perhaps your package is outdated and the company will upgrade you to a better one either for free or for a small upgrade fee.
Keep in mind, though, that very few people are getting the top speed (remember the words “up to” in your contract?) because of distance exchange, congestion, and traffic shaping.

2. Find the browser that works for you

Most people still use Internet Explorer, even though it’s not the fastest browser out there. If you are an active Internet user, it would be a good idea to check out different browsers, like Chrome, Firefox, and Opera to see which one works best for your connection type and your hardware configuration. For example, Chrome is particularly good for computers that are low on RAM, as it’s not as memory hungry as Firefox and IE.

3. Tweak your router

If you are using a router, you can probably speed up Internet by adjusting the router settings. There are too many routers to give specific advice, but most routers can be tweaked to open up ports and boost your Internet speed. Just check the manual for things that can be done to improve performance or use Google to find answers for your particular router.
Before you do any tweaking, check whether you are close enough to the router when you use the Internet. Being too far away from it can make the connection really slow and unstable.
Another thing you should try before changing any settings is to restart your router. Sometimes this simple action can dramatically speed up your Internet connection.

4. Prevent unauthorized access

If you are using wireless Internet connection, make sure that you are not sharing it with the whole neighbourhood. The more people use your connection, the slower it is for you. So at the very least set up a WEP password to stop unauthorised users from using your Internet connection. Or if your hardware is compatible, set up WPA encryption.

5. Control your bandwidth usage

There are many applications that will use your bandwidth in the background, like Windows Update, Windows Live Messenger, Skype, Real player, Adobe Reader updates, and other similar software. Most of them usually start automatically when you log on to Windows and connect to the Internet as soon as there is a connection. This means that these programs use your bandwidth when you are not actually using them.
Most of these applications can be configured not to start on Windows log-on or to at least ask permission to connect to the Internet. If you are not sure which programs are secretly using your bandwidth, you can use a free tool called Auslogics Task Manager. With the help of this program you can track which applications and processes are consuming your network traffic.
If your Internet connection speed dropped all of a sudden for no apparent reason, check your computer for malware and spyware. Malicious software often uses your Internet connection to send information to its developers.

6. Perform some basic PC maintenance

If your computer is slow, it doesn’t matter how fast your Internet connection is – everything will be slow because you computer can’t cope. The answer to that is to keep your computer in good shape and perform regular maintenance like disk cleanup and defrag, registry repair, and other tasks like monitoring your startup items and optimizing Windows services. This way you will not only speed up computer performance, but also speed up your Internet connection.

Highspeed Internet Can Become Sluggish

There are multiple possible contributing factors.
Modern ‘broadband’ high-speed internet connections should provide you 10 megabits-per-second download speeds or faster. The very high-end wired connections can provide 1000 megabits-per-second. 25 megabits-per-second is a very comfortable speed for most users in 2014. Your daily speed can vary, of course, as your neighbors possibly load the cable network, or it’s a particularly busy download time on the Net. But if you are getting less than 8 megabits-per-second, you should be concerned that you are getting cheated on your high-speed internet account.

Slow internet connections happen for various reasons, even when you pay for a ‘high-speed connection’ like DSL or cable. Because the Internet (and World Wide Web) is built on hundreds of different technologies trying to talk to each other, there are many places where data can slow down before it reaches your computer screen. Your ISP might be at fault, certainly, but there are many other factors to look at before assigning blame. Some of these slow points are within your control and can be quickly fixed with a little do-it-yourself effort.
Common Reasons Why Highspeed Internet Connections Perform More Slowly Than Claimed:
You will need to get both a modern gigabit-speed router and a gigabit network interface card (NIC) to achieve home speeds above 25 megabits-per-second.
Your modem-router might not be configured correctly.
Perhaps you have dishonest people leeching your wireless connection from across the alley.
You might have spyware/malware infecting your machine, and secretly using your internet bandwidth.
A download may be occurring in the background, and you are unaware of it as it leeches your bandwidth.
Your ISP (internet service provider) may be having issues with routing signals to you.
DNS (domain name system) tables might be outdated, so signals are getting sent to the wrong addresses on your ISP network.

Your browser memory cache is so full, your browser has to slow down to allow for its limited hard drive space.
Radio or microwave devices in your home might be degrading your internet wireless signal.
Your computer is more than 3 years old and is not able to move electrons fast enough for modern web pages.
You have unwittingly left dozens of windows open in the background, and they are clogging your computer CPU.
A Windows or Mac dialog box is sitting open and unanswered in the computer background, stalling your computer CPU while it awaits your yes/no input.

These are just some of many possibilities. If you think that your internet connection is slow, we recommend you do two things:

Do a speed test on your computer: DSLreports.com speed testing or Speedtest.net
Perform a troubleshoot on your computer: Troubleshooting list for your internet connection.

Information About Free Wireless Internet On Your Laptop

This is a neat little hack that I discovered last week when looking for a new cell phone plan. I had just gotten a BlackBerry Pearl, and the plan from T-Mobile came with unlimited data transfer for wireless internet on their EDGE network. (By the way this also works with other blackberry’s on other networks, and possibly other smartphones.)

I immediately installed mobile versions of GMail (never even bothered to look at the standard BlackBerry Mail app), Google Maps, and a 3rd party program to sync with my Google Calendar. I was quite happy with the whole experience given that I’d assumed it would cost a lot more for the whole “internet on a cell phone” experience. Remarkably enough, it didn’t. I was paying the same monthly rate ($59.99) as before with Cingular, except now I was getting all these new “web” features.

But then I discovered the killer app that was truly LifeHack.org worthy! A way to get that unlimited wireless on the cell phone to transfer over to my laptop.
In essence, some people have figured out how to use the blackberry as a wireless modem for their laptops using bluetooth. This has two big advantages:

While regular wireless internet is only available in limited locations, this wireless is available everywhere (or at least everywhere you have cell phone service)
Unlike T-Mobile’s HotSpots or other paid wireless services, this is free (or another way to look at it: you’re already paying for it)
Blackberry
And the really cool part is that if you have a laptop with integrated blue-tooth (the MacBook in my case, although some PC’s have this as well) then the entire process takes place wirelessly. In fact you never even have to take the phone out of your pocket! You can just connect at any time, as if it were a modem, in a few seconds.

(Note: if your laptop doesn’t have blue tooth, it will still work through the USB cable.)

To be fair, the speeds you get aren’t exactly blazing. It’s been years since I’ve used a 56k modem, but from what I can recall (and what others have reported) the speed you get with this setup is comparable to a 56k modem.

What this means is that it’s perfect to have in case you need to pull up GMail in an airport or remote location, but you aren’t going to be getting serious work done on it. Still, it has saved my behind a few times already, and after all it’s free if you have the blackberry, so why not take advantage of it.

How To Boost Your Wifi At Home

WiFi is an almost essential utility in today’s society. Everyone is connected to the web and it’s more important than ever to have that vital internet available in your house. Getting it to work well in your house may take some effort so here are some tips on how you can get WiFi to work better at home.

1. Buy a better router

I can’t tell you how many people I’ve helped out with WiFi problems that have had routers from the internet’s dark ages. Generally speaking, routers can last a long, long time and that makes it hard to justify upgrading them. What they don’t tell you is that newer routers have better range, stronger signal, and support for WiFi standards. If your router is more than five years old, simply giving it an upgrade will likely help fix many of your signal and disconnection problems.

2. Put your router in a better spot

Setting up a router is much like buying a home. It’s all about location, location, location. If you put your router on the second story of a two story home then the basement is going to get terrible signal. Put it in the basement and the second story of your home will probably have low signal that potentially drops out. When you set up your router, identify which parts in the house need WiFi the most. If putting it on one side means the garage doesn’t get WiFi and your office does then that’s a sacrifice you’ll have to make.

3. Get a router extender

There is equipment out there that can make your WiFi signal stronger. Here’s how it works. You buy an extender and plug it in between your router and the part of your house that doesn’t get any signal. Once it’s been connected it will take your router’s WiFi signal and amplify it in that area and effectively increase your WiFi range. This is a good solution for large or oddly shaped houses where a router may not get to everything. If you bought a new router and still have your old one, you can set up your old router as a WiFi extender. It’s a little complicated but it can solve a lot of wireless problems by pumping out a stronger signal to more parts of the house.

4. Find the right wireless channel

WiFi is broadcast on a channel. Usually there are 11 channels (1 through 11). On your Android or iOS device, go to your app store and search for “WiFi Analyzer”. Then connect your device to your WiFi and run the app. The app will tell you what channel you’re on and what channel everyone else in your area is on. Then, using your router’s manual (or Google), change your router to the channel where no one else is. If you’re on channel six and two other routers nearby are on channel six, you essentially have three routers broadcasting on the same channel. A good analogy for this is imagining what it would sound like if you tried broadcasting three radio stations on the same station. Changing the channel to an empty one will help your internet cut out less and broadcast further.

5. Move your router away from the interference

Routers aren’t the only things casting a signal in your house. Microwaves, TVs, cordless telephones, cell phones, and practically everything else that makes a beep or a bloop can cause interference. The best (and cheapest) way to deal with this is to move your router away from any of these appliances if you have it sitting near them. I’ve seen people put routers in the entertainment stands right along with their game systems, set top boxes, and TV. That’s a really bad idea. Your router should be all by itself for best performance.

6. Reboot your router on a regular basis
When a router runs for long enough, it can do some funky things. It’ll cut out, maybe slow down a bit, and sometimes just do crazy things all on its own. The best way to reel in an out of control router is to unplug it for about 30 seconds every couple of days. It sounds tedious but rebooting it lets the system restart itself and freshen up a bit. Trust me, it works. One reason routers do go nuts is overheating, so make sure you dust it occasionally and don’t stack anything on top of it so it can vent hot air.

7. Update your router firmware

There is a reason router manufacturers push out updates. It is to fix bugs, issues, and increase performance on their products. If they go through the trouble of fixing things, you should definitely go through the trouble of applying the update. Different brands of routers are accessed differently so your best bet is to visit the manufacturer website or consult your user manual to learn how to access your router settings on your computer. Once there, check for updates. You would be shocked how much a good, solid software update can fix things on a buggy router.

8. Make sure your computer’s hardware is not broken
A lot of times the problem isn’t the router, it’s the computer itself! Wireless adapters on computers and in laptops can go bad. If you’ve been tinkering with your router and you just can’t figure out the problem, check and make sure it’s not your computer. These days households have multiple devices that connect to the internet. If your computer is messing up, use your mobile device, tablet, or another laptop or computer to double check and make sure the internet is truly messed up. If everything works but one device, the problem may very well be that one device.

The worst thing about WiFi is that it’s really obnoxious to trouble shoot a problem. There are just so many things that could be going wrong. Your internet service provider could be down, your router could be broken, your computer could be broken, there could be interference, or your router may just need a reboot. I once had a dog that chewed through a cable and I didn’t find it for almost two hours. Just remember that you’re not the only one who has trouble with WiFi connections. Even professionally trained network administrators get stumped sometimes. Just relax and keep at it!

Make Wifi More Stable At Home

Stable, strongWiFi at home is a covetous thing. A reliable internet connection is no longer a frivolous wish, but an increasingly necessary tool for many people’s professional and personal lives. And, of course, it’s just plain frustrating to pay a hefty monthly fee for a mediocre connection. So what can you do if your home WiFi is pretty lackluster? Luckily, you don’t necessarily need to pay more for a premium internet package to improve your current connection.

A number of factors beyond our control affect our WiFi signals, such as the area you live in (rural vs. urban, for example), available service providers, and even geographical features like mountain ranges or valleys. But while those issues are hard to change, you can make some changes at home to improve what you have. You might even live in an area with typically sturdy WiFi, but have accidentally sabotaged your own connection by giving your router a less than ideal set-up.

StarHub created a video with a short list of five simple tips and tricks to boost your home WiFi connection’s range orsignal strength.Here are the tips themselves, and you can check out the actual video below the list!

1. Get your router high
…No, not like that. People’s favorite place to put their router— on the floor, in the corner of their living room or home office— is actuallypretty terrible. You know how people sometimes hold their cell phones above their heads to try and get a stronger signal?They’ve got the right idea. Your router should be mounted somewhere high off the ground, and in the center of your house to reach all ends equally.
2. Personal space
Think of your router like you woulda person who doesn’t like their personal space being invaded. Keep clutter away from the router (this will be easy if you do the suggestion above!). You also might want to see if any other devices or appliances near or next to your router are causing signal disruption. Microwaves, home phone sets, and even wires can interfere with your WiFi signal strength.
3. DIY modify
You can also try a simple do-it-yourself modification using a soda can. Cut the bottom of an empty soda can off, then cut the can lengthwiseto the top. Then, cut around the top in one direction and then in the opposite direction, leaving a little bit connecting the top to the can’s (now unfurled) body. Stick the router’s antenna through the hole in the top used to drink out of, and arrange the cut-out body so it looks a bit like a sail.

Keep in mind that people have reported varying levels of success with this trick, with some people claiming it had no perceivable effect. Still, it’s worth a shot for a small increase in signal strength.
4. Extend it
Not into DIY? Buy your way to farther-reachingWiFi. You can purchase WiFi extenderswhich will increasethe range of your signal. It does this by picking up your router’s signal and then rebroadcasting it, thus artificially extending its range. However, doing so usually decreases the strength of the signal, sothis is a solution for people who have a strong signal but a short range.
5. Go 2 for 1
There are some instances where more does not equal better, but happily this isn’t one of them! Having not one, but tworouters in your home will indeed increase the amount of signalsaround you and potentially solve your WiFi woes. Since there are plenty of affordable WiFi routers out there, this solution is both simple and low-cost.

The Best Internet Browser

We all want to get the most out of browsing the Web. That’s why everybody is constantly looking for a better, faster browser. Microsoft’s Internet Explorer is still the king of the hill, as it has the largest market share. However, Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome are quickly becoming more and more popular. But what is the best Internet browser? Let’s find out!

A lot of people will answer the “what is the best Internet browser” question by naming Internet Explorer as the best. Why? Simply because IE is the browser that’s included with any Windows computer by default. As a result, a lot of people just stick to Internet Explorer without ever bothering to check any of the other browsers. However, Internet Explorer has a lot of disadvantages. The main one is security flaws. Being the most used browser, IE is also the least secure one. It has a number of security flaws that Microsoft often fails to fix in time to protect the users from being infected. However, Internet Explorer has its advantages. It’s very easy to use and Internet Explorer is compatible with pretty much all websites, whereas other browsers can occasionally suffer from compatibility issues.

Mozilla Firefox is the second most popular Web browser in the world. Unlike Internet Explorer, Firefox is the browser of choice for more experienced computer users. That’s not because it’s difficult to use – advanced users love Firefox for its add-ons and extensions. There is an add-on for pretty much everything and for anyone, from software and Web developers to artists, musicians, social media fans, and users wanting to protect their computers. On top of that Firefox is fast, gets frequent updates and is often more stable than IE. That’s why for millions of people all over the world the questions what is the best Internet browser doesn’t exist – for them, it’s Firefox.

Developed by Google, Chrome is the newest browser of the three. Being relatively new isn’t preventing it from gaining popularity, though. That’s because Google Chrome is a very fast and a intuitive browser. It’s also pretty secure, which makes it an even more attractive choice. And there is a whole load of amazing add-ons that match Firefox’s in functionality and ease of use. When it comes to browsing speed, Chrome is usually the fastest of them all. The browser itself snaps open and pages load very quickly even if you are on a slower connection. So if speed is your top priority, Chrome is the browser for you. It also consumes the least amount of RAM compared to the other two. That’s why a lot of people are migrating to Chrome and choosing it as the answer to the what is the best Internet browser question.

As you can see, all of these browsers are good and what is the best Internet browser depends on your preferences and computer experience. The bottom line is that it’s your choice, so pick up the one you like best. Whether it’s IE, Firefox or Chrome – it doesn’t matter as long as you find it comfortable to use.

Defrag Your Drives In The Right Way

Defragmenting your hard drive may be one of the quickest and easiest, yet effective ways to boost your computer’s speed and improve performance. With hundreds of defragmenters available on the market, most offering multiple defrag and optimize options, how do you know what is right for your PC and what features you should use to maintain your hard drive in the best shape? In this article I will show you how to defrag your drives properly through 7 tricks that will help you get the results you are looking for. So roll up your sleeves and let’s defrag!

You’ve heard of fragmentation and what it does for your PC’s performance, and you have finally decided to do something about it. That’s a great start. You go online and look for tips on how to defrag your hard drive and find that you need a defragmenter to do this task, and that there is actually one built right into your Windows operating system. You research this program along with many third-party ones and decide that you want a defragger with more features and faster speeds. If you have decided to use the free Auslogics Disk Defrag, these tips will be especially useful for you, since I’ll be using this software as an example. If you have decided to use the Auslogics Disk Defrag Pro, you can get an Auslogics discount coupon here.

Trick #1: Don’t defragment junk!

This is actually not so obvious to most users until someone mentions it, and then it makes sense. Everything you do on your computer creates temporary files that don’t always get removed automatically. Emptying your recycle bin, browser cache and other temporary folders should be part of your standard maintenance routine, but doing it right before defragmentation is essential if you don’t want to waste time and effort defragging loads of useless junk. So make it a rule – defrag after cleanup. Some defragmenters allow automating the task by offering the option to delete temporary files prior to defragmentation. If using Auslogics Disk Defrag, you can set the program to automatically clean up by going to the Settings tab in the main menu, choosing Program Settings – Algorithms and checking the box next to Delete temporary files before defragmenting. This will ensure you never miss this important step when defragmenting.
Trick #2: Defrag only what needs to be defragged

Fragmentation is bad, and you may feel like you need to get every single file put back together, but it really isn’t always necessary. Defragmenting certain files may have zero effect on performance, so processing them is not only a waste of time and effort, but may also shorten the hard drive’s lifespan through excessive writing. What are those files? Large files that are broken up into large fragments generally don’t need to be defragged. Microsoft sets 64 MB as the threshold after which fragments are considered to be too large to even be included in fragmentation statistics, so the built-in Windows defragmenter will not process file fragments larger than 64 MB or include them when calculating the percentage of disk fragmentation. Auslogics Disk Defrag gives you more power in determining how big is too big or whether you want all of the fragmentation eliminated regardless of the fragment size. You can configure your own threshold by going to Settings – Program Settings – Algorithms and set the minimum size for fragments to be skipped. It can be a number from 1 MB to 10 GB, or you may choose not to check this box and the program will process every single file.
Trick #3: Don’t lose your system restore points!

Lost system restore points in Windows are a common complaint with people using disk defragmenters on machines running Vista and later Windows versions. What happens is the defrag operation moves files around causing the Volume Shadow Copy Service (VSS) to create snapshots that overwrite older ones and cause restore points to get deleted. If you have VSS enabled on your hard drive, or if you are not sure if you do, the first thing you should do after installing Auslogics Disk Defrag is go to Program Settings – Algorithms and set the program to defragment in VSS-compatible mode. This prevents excessive growth of the VSS storage area and ensures that your system restore points will remain intact.
Not all defraggers have this option, so be sure to never use the ones that don’t if you have VSS enabled.
Trick #4: If you are scared to touch that SSD, don’t!

Defragmenting Solid State Drives (SSD’s) is a controversial topic with most experts agreeing that it does more harm than good. Since SSD’s don’t have moving parts, reading data off of them is different as in considerably faster. Reading file fragments located in adjacent blocks is generally no different than reading fragments scattered all over the drive. What’s more, modern SSD’s may even break up files on purpose placing fragments in cells that haven’t been heavily used, which is done to even out the wear that inevitably occurs with every write operation. Since defragmentation involves moving files around and therefore writing, it can cause excessive wear to an SSD.
Auslogics Disk Defrag lets you set the program not to show your SSD drive in the list of drives to prevent accidentally launching defragmentation for it.
Trick #5: Put those files where they belong!

Defragmentation is half the job, as besides being whole, files need to be placed efficiently as to minimize the time needed to access them. Different defragmenters may use different optimization algorithms. The Defrag & Optimize feature in Auslogics Disk Defrag, besides defragmenting the files, consolidates free space on the drive, moves regular files out of the space reserved for the Master File Table (MFT) and moves system files to the front of the hard drive.
System files are files that are essential for your operating system. Their proper placement can do a lot for improving system performance. With use, these files may get scattered around the drive and make Windows look for them all over the place when it needs to access them. Good defragmenters give you the option to place system files at the front of the hard drive, where stuff gets read faster. In Auslogics Disk Defrag you can select this option in Settings – Program Settings – Algorithms. However helpful this may be, it makes defragmentation go much slower, so it’s not something you would want to do every time you defrag. Use this feature once a week or even once a month, depending on how much use your PC normally gets.
Trick #6: You don’t need to wait for defragmentation to finish

Although with modern defragmenters like Auslogics Disk Defrag you can continue using your PC while defragmentation is running, it is still a good idea to limit PC use or run the defrag when you are away from your computer, if you want to get the best results. Many people like to defrag at the end of the day, and there used to be advice to keep your PC on overnight for defragmentation to run. With Auslogics Disk Defrag you don’t have to worry about waiting for the operation to complete or keeping your PC on for a whole night. You can simply check a box to shut down your computer after defragmentation, and your PC will be safely turned off when the defrag finishes.

Trick #7: Don’t obsess! Or do, if you really like to.

Defragmentation can be fascinating and many PC users find themselves sitting by the screen watching those squares on the cluster map move around and get combined into whole blocks. If you find yourself doing this, you are not alone. We can assume two things – you have possibly completely lost the point of defragmenting your hard drive, but, on the other hand, you may have found a perfect new entertainment or an effective new relaxation technique. Since defragmentation is supposed to make your computer faster and help you not sit and wait by the screen for tasks to complete, watching the defragmenter do its job seems to achieve the completely opposite effect. However, that’s just on the surface. As opposed to waiting for typed letters to appear on a slow computer’s screen, this activity can actually be quite enjoyable, especially if your defragmenter is a pleasure to look at.

Auslogics Disk Defrag lets you customize the cluster map appearance so you can select one of about a dozen looks, or pick a new look every time you defrag if you like. This is something you don’t get with Windows built-in defrag tool. With Auslogics you can click on individual blocks on the map and see what files are located there, how many fragments they have and what their status is. And you get reports after every operation, so you can see what has been done and whether or why there are any fragmented files remaining.

Defragmentation is still a necessary job even with modern day hard drives running the Windows OS. However, it really doesn’t have to be a dreaded task or something you prefer not to even think about. With modern defragmenters like Auslogics Disk Defrag you can schedule the task for a convenient time, have your PC set to be shut down after the operation or really enjoy using your defragmenter with customizable looks. So the question is not whether to defrag, but how to defrag the right way, which I hope this article brings you a little closer to understanding.

Know More About Wireless Home Networking Equipment List

Make sure you have the equipment you need to enjoy the benefits of wireless networking in your home.
Overview

Interested in setting up a wireless network in your home? You’ll be able to keep your laptop, tablet, e-reader and other WiFi devices connected to the Internet from anywhere within the WiFi signal range. With wireless networking, you can download photos, stream videos and even print documents from every room in your house. There’s so much you can do with WiFi, but you have to make sure you have the right home networking equipment first.

Here’s a list of the networking equipment you need to connect your computers, tablets, game systems, and more to the Internet and to each other. See Set Up Your Wireless Gateway and Connect Your Wireless Network for more information.
Modem

A modem is a device that connects to the internet with a coaxial cable, the same cable that provides TV service to your cable box.

To see if you have a Comcast-approved modem, or to find out which modem is right for your level of Internet service, look for its name at the DOCSIS Device Information Center. Select your level of service (found on your billing statement) to see a list of modems that will work for your network.
Router

A router is a wireless capable device that transmits a wireless signal. Wireless devices, such as laptops and tablets, use this signal to connect to each other and the Internet through a modem.

Wireless routers typically support one of two wireless standards, Wireless-G& or Wireless-N. Wireless-N is newer and Comcast recommends that users with Blast! or Extreme XFINITY Internet service upgrade to a Wireless-N router. While you can access the Internet with all routers regardless of your speed tier, a Wireless-G router may prevent you from getting the maximum possible speeds.

Note: To create a wireless home network, you’ll need both a router and a modem, or a gateway that functions as both (see below).

The following routers are Comcast-approved:
Netgear WNR1000 (Wireless-N)
Netgear WNR 3500 (Wireless-N)
Linksys WRT310N (Wireless-N)
Netgear WGR614v8 (Wireless-G)

The following routers are Comcast-approved, but are older models with limited support:
Netgear CG814v1 (Wireless-G)
Netgear CG814v2 (Wireless-G)
Linksys WCG200v1 (Wireless-G)
Linksys WCG200v2 (Wireless-G)
Linksys BEFCMUH4 (Wireless-G)
A wireless gateway is a device that functions as both a modem and a router, which means you only need one device to set up your wireless home network. The Comcast-provided Wireless Gateway 1 (Model Numbers TG852G, TG862G, SMCD3DNV, TC8305C) or Wireless Gateway 2 (Model Number DPC3939) also provide XFINITY Voice service and have four ports for wired connection to your network.

Both the Wireless Gateway 1 and Wireless Gateway 2 support all residential XFINITY Internet service tiers through Extreme 105. They also come equipped with preset features that help you set up your wireless network in a quick and secure way. See What is a Wireless Gateway from Comcast? for more information.
Wireless Adapter

A wireless adapter is a device that enables computers or laptops without wireless capability to connect to a wireless network. Generally, wireless adapters are available in USB or card formats.

To find out if your computer needs a wireless adapter, follow these steps.

Windows
Click the start menu or right-click the My Computer icon and select Manage.
Select Device Manager.
Windows – Device Manager
Click + next to Network Adapters.
Windows – Device Manager – Network Adapters
If any adapter says Wireless, your computer supports wireless networking.
Mac OS
Click the Apple in the upper left-hand corner of your screen and select System Preferences.
Select Network.
Mac OS X – System Preferences
If Airport is listed, your computer supports wireless networking.
WiFi Device

A WiFi device is any device that can connect to a wireless network. This includes computers, laptops, game systems, printers, tablets, and mobile devices.